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SHC Solar Update Newsletter (2014)

Submitted by Pam Murphy on December 5, 2014

Don't miss reading the latest SHC Solar Update newsletter.  This issue highlights China, work on solar cooling, solar and urban planning, solar and heat pumps and the new global certification network plus other news and the latest free SHC publications.

Editor: Pam Murphy

Date: October 2014

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France: Promising Monitoring Results of Solar-Cooling Hybrid Strategy

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 5, 2014
Hybrid Solar Cooling ConceptDuring the Task 48 meeting in Garching, Germany, at the end of September 2014, Daniel Mugnier, Head of Task 48 of the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling programme, presented the monitoring results of a promising demonstration project which integrates solar cooling technology into an existing building cluster. Engineered by Tecsol, the system has been supplying energy to two buildings housing offices and flats in Montpellier, in the south of France, since May 2012. The special characteristic of the system owned by the SERM (Société d’Équipement de la Région Montpelliéraine) is a hybrid mode in which the 240 m2 field with double-glazed collectors supplies heat to a single-effect lithium-bromide absorption chiller in summer, as well as domestic hot water to the block of flats all year round. During the main cooling season in July and August, the electrical coefficient of performance (COP) showed a very high average of 12, while the measured thermal COP during the same period was, on average, 0.6. 
Figure: Tecsol
 

Sweden: Novel Solar Cooling Installation Boasts Average Electrical COP of 10.6

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on October 28, 2014
ConferenceThe first large-scale system which incorporates the newly developed CoolStore chiller by Swedish company ClimateWell was commissioned in June 2014 and has since been operating flawlessly at Swedish coffee producer Löfbergs in Karlstad, Sweden. In the middle of October, ClimateWell organised a mini-conference at Löfbergs in order to showcase the installation and its first monitoring results. The measurements taken between 11 and 25 July showed an average electrical coefficient of performance (COPel) of 10.6. This is more than twice as much as for a conventional electric vapour compression system, which has a COPel of between 2 and 5. The highest COP measured at the demonstration plant was 12.
Photos: ClimateWell
 

Overview of Solar Thermal Process Heat & Cooling in India (2012)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on October 2, 2014

This presentation was given by Dr. A.K. Singhal of the Indian Ministry of New & Renewable Energy at the 3rd Indo-German Energy Symposium in Delhi in May 2012.  The speaker provides a detailed overview of the various solar thermal technologies already available or still under development in India.  The presentation focuses on Solar Water Heating (SWH), Solar Air Heating, Process Heat and Solar Cooling.   SHW is well developed in India and in 2012 5.10 million m² of collectors had already been installed, with the objective to reach 18.7 million by 2022.

USA: S.O.L.I.D. Operates 3.4 MWth Cooling System as ESCO in Arizona

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on August 29, 2014
Desert Mountain High SchoolIt is an ideal location for solar cooling use: Scottsdale, a US city in the Greater Phoenix area in Arizona enjoys an average of 312 days of sunshine every year. Between May and September, temperatures rise above 38°C and can even reach 46°C on a hot day. This is where in July 2011, Austrian company S.O.L.I.D has started to plan a solar cooling system for Scottsdale’s Desert Mountain High School (DMHS) of 2,600 students. Three years later, the 3.4 MWth (4,865 m² of collector area) system went into operation and is now supplying heat to a single-effect lithium bromide absorption chiller with a cooling capacity of 1,750 kW. The solar cooling installation at the DMHS is currently the largest of its kind in the world, having surpassed the 2.7 MWth solar thermal capacity (3,900 m²) of another S.O.L.I.D system at the United World College (UWC) in Singapore.
Photo: S.O.L.I.D.
 

South Africa: Fresnel Collectors Keep It Cool in MTN’s Server Rooms

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on August 28, 2014
Industrial SolarSince June 2014, a Fresnel collector field with 242 kWth has been feeding into the district cooling system of the MTN Group at its headquarters in Johannesburg, South Africa. MTN, which has more than 200 million customers, as well as subsidiaries in 22 countries across Africa and the Middle East, is one of the leading mobile operators in South Africa – and it is aware of the impact of global warming. “We continuously explore ways in which we can lessen the impact of our operations on the environment. This initiative will not only reduce our carbon footprint but it will substantially reduce our electricity consumption, which will release additional capacity for the national grid,” MTN’s CEO, Zunaid Bulbulia, was quoted as saying in a press release from 17 July 2014. The concentrating solar thermal plant powers the double-effect absorption chiller whose cooling capacity of 330 kW keeps temperatures low in the data centre at MTN’s head office. 
Photo: Industrial Solar
 

Germany: SunOyster’s New Approach to Combine PV and Solar Heat

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 1, 2014
SunOysterSunOyster Systems (SOS) based in Halstenbek, a town near Hamburg, Germany, has developed a new technology for the combined generation of solar heat and electricity (PVT). The first six SunOyster units are currently on their way to the Chinese town of Shuouzhou, 400 km west of Beijing. Yonghao Gangue Power Plant bought the system to feed electricity into its grid, as well as to supply heat to its district heating network. The network provides both space heating for an industrial area in winter and heat for a 10 kW adsorption chiller in summer. The photo shows company founder Carsten Corino next to the SunOyster demonstration unit at the company site in Halstenbek. The mirror on the left has been placed higher than the one on the right to minimise shading. 
Photo: Eva Augsten
 

REN 21: Solar Thermal Contributes Significantly to Hot Water Production

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 30, 2014
top ten 2012According to REN21’s Renewables 2014 Global Status Report, which was published at the UN-hosted Sustainable Energy for All Forum in New York at the beginning of June, solar thermal technologies contribute significantly to hot water production in many countries and increasingly to space heating and cooling, as well as industrial processes. REN21 is a global multi-stakeholder network for renewable energy policy, connecting key actors from governments, international organisations, industry associations, science and academia, as well as civil society. First released in 2005, the report provides a comprehensive and timely overview of renewable energy markets, industries, investments and policy developments worldwide. The renewable energy data is provided by an international network of more than 500 contributors, researchers and authors. According to report data, the world added 55.4 GWth (more than 79 million m2) of solar heat capacity in 2012, increasing the cumulative installed capacity of all collector types in operation by over 14 % for a year-end total of 283.4 GWth. The chart above shows the shares in global capacity in operation across 2012’s top ten countries.
Source: Renewables 2014 Global Status Report
 

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